USA Sew and Vac

USA Sew and Vac Here to cater to your sewing and vacuuming needs. repair service, authorized , Patriot vacuum retailer, consignment sales, sewing and vacuum
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Operating as usual

06/29/2020

We are open for business, due to Covid19 our days and hours of operation are Tuesdays - Fridays 12 PM to 4 PM by appointment. Please call 520-458-9077.

06/29/2020
06/29/2020
USA Sew and Vac's cover photo
06/29/2020

USA Sew and Vac's cover photo

USA Sew and Vac
06/29/2020

USA Sew and Vac

09/20/2018

Sale Sale Sale Sale!!!! 2-days only(Sept. 20 & 21) Thursday and Friday. Come and check us out.

#12 Cording foot aka piping foot, braiding foot.  This foot comes in various depths allowing for a foot that "works" wit...
08/20/2017

#12 Cording foot aka piping foot, braiding foot. This foot comes in various depths allowing for a foot that "works" with the desired product while giving a professional finish.

The braiding foot normally has holes in it, in addition to the "welt depth on the bottom. These normally come in 3, 5, or 7 hole. The ones that state that they are piping feet, do not normally have the additional holes. And the ones that state Cording, come with one or more "welts in the bottom". So guess what? If you are into a lot of different surface embellishments (pillow construction, crazy quilting, machine sewn stained glass, or braided patterns), you may need several types for your desired effect.

These feet are all of the same family. They add embellishments to the surface of a project or to the edges of a project.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mGsh8vaCBQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GIrPxIXB7Y

#11 Fringe foot aka  tailor tack foot, or looper foot.  The fringing foot is designed for fagoting and sewing thread fri...
08/20/2017

#11 Fringe foot aka tailor tack foot, or looper foot. The fringing foot is designed for fagoting and sewing thread fringe. This decorative touch is especially effective in applique work. The foot has a small divider in it so that when you make a wide zig-zag stitch, you will wind up with a very large loop. Then simply cut the loop close to one side of the stitches. whichever side you want the fringe to be free on, and you'll have made your own thread fringe! Tailor tacking allows for accurate pattern marking.

Another use for this foot is quilted thread art. It gives a variety of fur like qualities, curly hair, or with a running stitch through the loops can even give the impression of feathers. This is a foot worth spending time on to go through all the various possibilities and uses. It also gives a raised satin stitch finish that can add more dimension to an applique. The fringe looks like eyelash fringe, I will normally add fusible interfacing to the back of the finished project to protect the fringe from abuse through normal use.

Youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK5rwXvylys

#10 Rolled hem foot.  A french seam requires the stitching of the seam, folding and ironing the seam allowance to the se...
07/30/2017

#10 Rolled hem foot.

A french seam requires the stitching of the seam, folding and ironing the seam allowance to the seam line, folding the ironed pleat over the seam line and then stitching it down. This is commonly referred to as a french seam on the inside of the garment or a flat felled seam on the outside of the garment.

The Rolled hem foot does a narrow french seam with only one line of stitching. This is a wonderful seam for finishing raw edges or cleaning up seams on slips or lace dresses. It does not do well on heavy weight fabric. Unless it is one layer only. So the rule of thumb is to try a sample before working with a new project.

This is one of my favorite feet. It uses the straight stitch only.

#9 Roller Foot for Denim / Velvet / LeatherAs its name suggests, this foot has rollers that roll on top the fabric – it’...
07/30/2017

#9 Roller Foot for Denim / Velvet / Leather

As its name suggests, this foot has rollers that roll on top the fabric – it’s very much like the track on a bulldozer (but much gentler) for sewing up and over heavy seams and uneven surfaces.

Roller Sewing Machine Presser Foot is effective for preventing difficult or heavy fabric from slipping or puckering or jamming up under the foot, because the presser foot rotates to feed the upper layer together with the lower layer. Excellent for denim, velvet or leather! It is nice on vinyl as well as multiple layers of canvas.

#8 Open Toe Applique FootSometimes called an “Open Toe Embroidery Foot”, the open front ensures greater visibility while...
07/30/2017

#8 Open Toe Applique Foot

Sometimes called an “Open Toe Embroidery Foot”, the open front ensures greater visibility while sewing, it has a stitching area wide enough for maximum stitch width without compromising control.

Perfect for applique, the bottom of the foot has a rectangular or wedge shaped indentation, which allows even satin / blanket stitching to glide under the foot without dragging. .

The toes of the foot are shorter, compared to a regular zigzag foot. This makes it easier for those who would like to try machine embroidery before completely going free-hand on the darning foot (kinda like a training wheel for learning machine embroidery… if you like).

#7 Binding foot.Adjustable Binding FootThe full name is “Universal Adjustable Tape / Bias Binding Foot”. Use the dials a...
07/30/2017

#7 Binding foot.
Adjustable Binding Foot

The full name is “Universal Adjustable Tape / Bias Binding Foot”. Use the dials and adjust the foot to suit various width of bindings.

A VERY specialised tool, all this foot does is put bindings around the cut edge of the fabric (often a contrast colour, might even be in completely different weight / type).

Using this foot ensures your binding is always neat and professional-looking; without any hand tacking or excessive pinning.

I have found this foot difficult to use on some quilts because I have to fight the weight of the quilt to keep the edge in the channel and the binding to not get lost in the layers. In order to fight this effectively, pinning is necessary and the use of fabric glue saves the fight.

07/29/2017

Heavy duty sewing machines: There are many heavy duty machines on the market. Most folks understand that heavy duty machines are supposed to be able to manage multiple layers of fabric, such as flat felled seams on denim.

Unfortunately, while many are touted to be heavy duty, they may fall short of buyer expectation. Unless someone is looking into buying an industrial machine, there are certain key words that should be looked for when buying a heavy duty machine for upholstery, sailcloth, tent making, shade making, etc.

1. The words "heavy duty", meaning type power of downward motion on the needle. Whoops. Thats right. It does not mean all metal parts. It is possible that the material will not feed properly or could bunch up.

2. "Dual feed". This means that the layers will be pushed through the top and bottom foot at the same pace. This is similar to using a walking foot but is less likely to be damaged. It may state "walking foot machine".

3. Number of stitches. Well, if you are sewing a tent....a straight stitch is enough. The real test comes from how many layers of denim can be sewn through. Most heavy duty machines say 4 to 6. However, if the idea is upholstery or tent making.....8 or more layers of denim would be suggested as the standard. However, if one size meets all needs of the sewist, a heavy duty machine with more than just straight stitches and zigzag may be needed.

Most heavy duty machines are not meant to also make silk blouses. If this is a requirement, a home version Janome, Singer, Juki, etc., heavy duty machine may be in order.

4. Stitches per minute. High volume output requires a machine that can keep up. A hobbyist normally does not care as much as a professional where throughput is money in the bank.

5. Bobbin size or volume. This directly impacts the amount of throughput.

6. The types of fabrics it can sew. Most machines can handle lightweight leather. However, shoe leather is thicker so it is good to know exactly what types of leather the sewist desires to use, how often (volume), and what the cost of the machine is and what the cost of the service is (if hired out, or desired profession). In other words, will you need it once a year or once a week? Or daily.

7, Durability. Where and when will the machine be used? Will it go on field trips, a boat, near a swimming pool, in the garage, or be in a climate controlled area? Most homes are climate controlled but other places like sheds, garages, etc., are not climate controlled. Therefore, a heavy duty machine may need to be marine grade to work well out of climate controlled areas or to go on long trips.

8. Ease of threading needles, This effects the ease of use and throughput.

9. The most common requirements is cost. When calculating the cost of a sewing machine, the cost of maintenance should also be taken into consideration. While a manual sewing machine may cost 80.00 to repair in NYC, the cost of an electronic machine will commonly cost twice that, an industrial machine will cost up to 10 times higher than a manual machine, and a heavy duty machine with one or two stitches will cost slightly more than a manual sewing machine but less than an electronic. Therefore, the more stitches, the more moving parts, the more cost for maintenance. Maintenance should be done at least once per year depending on usage. Then add the cost of the machine and subtract the number of finished products X retail cost. Is your machine worth the cost? If not, you are a hobbyist. So what is the cost of your toy?

If the machine is to be used for making tents, etc., I highly suggest using an all metal machine. I have my favorite, but it costs some money for the machine, the maintenance is much less than others. It is fully dependent on the amount of usage and type of usage.

#6 Darning foot, aka Free motion foot, Free motion quilting foot, Hopping foot, Big Foot as well as other names.  This f...
07/29/2017

#6 Darning foot, aka Free motion foot, Free motion quilting foot, Hopping foot, Big Foot as well as other names.

This foot provides easy sight of the sewing area, easy movement of fabric under the foot, and needs the feed dogs on the machine to be lowered. The movement of the layers of quilting is controlled entirely by the quilter. Care should be taken to move the material slowly and not make any sudden moves.

There are two major differences between darning feet: Open toe and closed toe.

Preference for which darning foot to use is up to the sewist. This foot is most likely to break at the top where it holds onto the needle shank screw. Once that breaks, the foot needs to be thrown away. So, it is always best to have more than one on hand. It never seems to break at a convenient time.

#5  Walking foot, aka even feed foot.As you stitch with your regular presser foot, the feed dogs—found just underneath t...
07/29/2017

#5 Walking foot, aka even feed foot.

As you stitch with your regular presser foot, the feed dogs—found just underneath the presser foot in the bed of your machine—are chugging along, helping to move the fabric through the sewing machine.

But what is that old presser foot doing?

That pesky little thing is only moving across the top of the fabric. Depending on how much pressure is put on the presser foot (a manual adjustment on most machines) it is pushing the top layer fabric TOWARDS you— instead of through the sewing machine.

Quilt with a standard presser foot...and the result is a puckered mess and arms and shoulders begin to ache as the quilter fights to keep the layers together.

Every walking foot has a fork or extension or bar that rides on the needle clamp screw. As the needle bar moves up, the walking foot moves and feed dogs engage.

When the needle is in the quilt sandwich, both sets of feed dogs are retracted from the quilt. As the needle comes up and leaves the quilt sandwich both sets of feed dogs move forward, then simultaneously grab the quilt sandwich and pull the layers together and through the machine until just before the needle pierces the fabric again. Just as the needle pierces the fabric, the feed dogs release it.

It's simple. If the needle is in the fabric, the feed dogs are pulled back. Needle out of the fabric, the feed dogs are pulling the sandwich evenly through your sewing machine.

Read your instructions that came with your walking or even feed foot. You may need to reduce the amount of pressure applied to the foot as part the installation.

This is a mechanical foot.

It wears out with use.

I know because I've replaced a foot due to oodles and oodles of ditch and straight line quilting.

How to tell?

If the foot and it's feed dogs don't move as the needle clamp screw goes up and down, it is broken.

The arm (sometimes it is more like a fork) is the weakest part, so do take care where you store it to extend its useful life.

Some of the faults can be corrected by tightening a screw. However, if that does not work.....do not unscrew the main compartment. It will take hours of work and many fingers to try to get it all back together again....and is not worth it....have one in use and a backup one still in the case. These never break at a convenient time.

foot #3 and #4:The 1/4 inch footThe 1/4 inch foot was specifically developed for quilters but is also very useful for ed...
07/29/2017

foot #3 and #4:
The 1/4 inch foot
The 1/4 inch foot was specifically developed for quilters but is also very useful for edge stitching clothing and bags. Use of the foot requires the sewist keeps the right edge of the material against the inside blade of the foot. It is also used for making pintucks.
The other foot with a blade is the edge joining foot or stitch in the ditch foot. It is the same foot but has two different names because of Youtube videos and manufacturers preferences. The blade is in the center of the foot, materials to be aligned are butted up against the right side of the blade as well as the left side of the blade and a stitch such as the zigzag, cross stitch, or ladder stitch is used to secure both sides of the fabric to one another. This is a great foot to top stitching two finished blocks together like cathedral windows. Testing first will give better results on the finished project.

The other foot with a blade is the edge joining foot or stitch in the ditch foot. It is the same foot but has two different names because of Youtube videos and manufacturers preferences. The blade is in the center of the foot, materials to be aligned are butted up against the right side of the blade as well as the left side of the blade and a stitch such as the zigzag, cross stitch, or ladder stitch is used to secure both sides of the fabric to one another. This is a great foot to top stitching two finished blocks together like cathedral windows. Testing first will give better results on the finished project.

foot #3 and #4:The 1/4 inch footThe 1/4 inch foot was specifically developed for quilters but is also very useful for ed...
07/27/2017

foot #3 and #4:
The 1/4 inch foot

The 1/4 inch foot was specifically developed for quilters but is also very useful for edge stitching clothing and bags. Use of the foot requires the sewist keeps the right edge of the material against the inside blade of the foot. It is also used for making pintucks.

The other foot with a blade is the edge joining foot or stitch in the ditch foot. It is the same foot but has two different names because of Youtube videos and manufacturers preferences. The blade is in the center of the foot, materials to be aligned are butted up against the right side of the blade as well as the left side of the blade and a stitch such as the zigzag, cross stitch, or ladder stitch is used to secure both sides of the fabric to one another. This is a great foot to top stitching two finished blocks together like cathedral windows. Testing first will give better results on the finished project.

foot #2:The zigzag foot.  This foot has an opening that is wide and allows stitches up to 7 width to be utilized.  This ...
07/27/2017

foot #2:

The zigzag foot. This foot has an opening that is wide and allows stitches up to 7 width to be utilized. This includes all specialty stitches on electronic machines. Some have viewing windows, such as the foot in this display. This one also comes with a button on the back left side. When stitching over welting or multi layers the button allows the sewist to set the rear or front of the presserfoot at the level of the back, making sewing over multiple layers easier. Note: when sewing over welting or heavy seams, a slow even pace is best. Otherwise, needle breakage or timing problems may develop. The choce of which type of zigzag foot is best - is mostly contingent on availability and sewist acumen. For beginners, any will do. Just slow down a little as wide stitches take more thread and tend to need more time.

While this is normally referred to as the general purpose foot, I have found that the straight stitch foot is better for quilt piecing because it holds both sides of the cloth better. It is also better for some specialty cloths but not for stretchy materials as they require a wobbly stitch and therefore the zigzag foot is required.

07/17/2017

USA Sew & Vac is the best place in town to find vacuum cleaner parts and bags and sewing machine accessories. Don't forget servicing of vacuums and sewing machines.

Alternatively, here are pics of low shank, high shank, and slant shank straight stitch feet
07/17/2017

Alternatively, here are pics of low shank, high shank, and slant shank straight stitch feet

Foot #1:  Straight stitch.Pictured is a straight stitch snap on foot (the bar in the back is the snap on.  The circle is...
07/17/2017

Foot #1: Straight stitch.

Pictured is a straight stitch snap on foot (the bar in the back is the snap on. The circle is where the needle descends through the cloth. The division of the metal in the front is a visual guide of where the seam would be made so that the sewist is able to visually line up the desired stitch line.

If a zig zag stitch is selected on the machine dial or stitch selector, damage to the needle, machine timing, and foot is possible.

Hopefully, now that the shank on the machine has been identified, it will make it easier to determine whether a screw on...
07/17/2017

Hopefully, now that the shank on the machine has been identified, it will make it easier to determine whether a screw on foot will work with the machine in question. But we are not done. Whether the machine is a high shank or low shank it can use any snap on foot (I believe, because I have not run into one that does not work yet). However, to use snap on feet the machine must have a snap on foot adapter. (these may look different from the picture, based on manufacturer as well as whether it is high or low shank. The end that is snap on looks the same though).
In place of the lever, it may have a small button in the back. This is the quick release, so trading out another foot during a project becomes easy.

Address

640 E. Fry Blvd.
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85635

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Located in theSierra Vista Safeway Plaza

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Thursday 10am - 5pm
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Comments

You guys still in business? You used to be over by Safeway, then inside the mall... now where is 100 E. Fry Blvd.? That little nook shopping center next to Wells-Fargo, not far from Sun 'n' Spokes bicycle shop? We need carpet shampoo for our Kirby Sentria.
I took my shark vaccum in for a replacement spring for one of the latches that snaps my canister on... The spring was the size that's in a pen.but a bit. shorter.... It was $3.50.. the LABOR WAS 59.99!!!!!!??? WTH??!!! That's not what I was told... And of course the owner wasn't in... Guess I jus paid for somebody's past due bill!!!! I also had taken in a Bissell... Well it seems it had a blown motor... Ok.. fine... Then .. was told the labor cost.. was $39.99.. ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!!!! I should have just bought a new vaccum!!
Hopefully, now that the shank on the machine has been identified, it will make it easier to determine whether a screw on foot will work with the machine in question. But we are not done. Whether the machine is a high shank or low shank it can use any snap on foot (I believe, because I have not run into one that does not work yet). However, to use snap on feet the machine must have a snap on foot adapter. (these may look different from the picture, based on manufacturer as well as whether it is high or low shank. The end that is snap on looks the same though). In place of the lever, it may have a small button in the back. This is the quick release, so trading out another foot during a project becomes easy.
Sewing machine feet. I think the best here is to discuss different feet each day until I cover all feet. When buying feet, it is important to know what type of attachment is needed to interface with the desired foot. There are three basic machine shanks. Most are low shank, but check first using the following information: Some presser feet are designed to be fasten directly onto the shank, with the thumb screw, as opposed to simply being “snapped” onto the foot adaptor like most feet that came with your machine. Walking foot is a classic one in this category – and knowing the right shank height means you get it right from the start.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye-hCnUM460&t=73s This video uses fleece instead of batting. Therefore it is fine to do minimal quilting to keep the three layers together. If using 100% cotton batting, quilting must be minimally 2 inches apart. This is the same for any 100% natural material batting. On the sides of batting bags, minimal distance for quilting is normally stated. 80% natural can go to 3 inches, etc. The main suggestion here is also do not use scissors to square off corners. Use a small square ruler, old toothbrush handle, your fingers, or blunt chopstick. Quillow pillow cases may be attached to the quillow or added at the bottom of a quillow. Rule of thumb for measurements are: fold quilt like you are putting it away, measure width from table surface across top of quilt horizontally, and add one inch for the width. Measure all the way around the quilt vertically and add an inch for the full sized of the pillowcase. The pillowcase may be sewn to the back of the quilt or at the bottom of the quilt to the binding and my be quilted or just a pillow case. This is a design feature. Quillows are great gifts for families to have in the car in case of accident or children falling asleep or getting stuck in the snow. They are also nice for an additional bed covering in case a guest needs more than the bedding normally on the bed.